Fall 2020 Courses

(*) undergraduate class. Contact instructor for possibility of cross-listing with graduate section.

Anthropology

ANTH 5590 Topics in Social and Cultural Anthropology - Memory and Commemoration

Deborah Durham     TuTh 9:30am - 10:45am

*ANTH 4591 Majors Seminar - Knowing, Race, and Coloniality

Cory-Alice Andre-Johnson     Tu 2:00pm - 4:30pm    

The majors seminars in anthropology offer majors and minors an opportunity to engage deeply with a topic of anthropological concern. Through these courses anthropology students gain experience in doing an independent research project on a topic they care about and produce a significant paper or other major work. Enrollment for majors and minors is preferred.

*ANTH 3290 Biopolitics and the Contemporary Condition

Aidan Seale-Feldman     Tu 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Biopolitical analysis has become one of the prominent critical approaches across the social sciences and humanities. This course will consider various biopolitical theories and the ways in which they help us understand diverse phenomena of our contemporary condition, which will be examined through various case studies.

History

For more courses in the Corcoran Department of History, please visit: https://history.virginia.edu/fall-2020.

HIST 5001 Policy Design and Statecraft

Philip Zelikow     Mo 2:00pm - 4:30pm

The seminar orients students to the professional world of statecraft by working through historical case studies. Breaking down critical episodes step by step, analyzing the perspectives, information, and choices of different participants, students gain more lifelike education and insight. Applying templates for policy design and assessment, they get more experience working on public problems and learning a lot of history along the way.

HIEU 5061 Roman Imperialism

Elizabeth Meyer    Tu 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Examines Roman transmarine expansion to determine how and why it happened, and what consequences it had, both in Rome and abroad. Prerequisite: HIEU 2041 or equivalent.

HIEU 5352 The British Economy Since 1850

Mark Thomas    Mo 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Studies the structure, performance and policy in the British economy since 1850, focusing on the causes and consequences of Britain's relative economic decline. Cross listed as ECON 5352.

HIST 5559 Global Protests/Racism and Police Brutality

Penny Von Eschen    Th 3:30pm - 6:00pm

This course will focus on the years from the 1970s through the present; looking at the politics of neo-liberalism and fiscal austerity governance in the industrialized world as well as the global south. Taking a global view, some weeks will zoom in on particular regions and nations including South Africa, the former Yugoslavia, Russia, and the United States.  Other weeks will tract thematic issues globally from health care and food insecurity, to an analysis of the U.N. "World Happiness Report," asking how happiness is constructed in a post-social safety net, post mass-society world.

HIST 7001 Approaches to Historical Study

Allan Megill, Fahad Bishara    We 6:00pm - 8:30pm

This course is designed as an introductory seminar for graduate students in all fields and periods of history. It is required of all first-year doctoral students in the History Department. It aims to introduce students to the process of researching and writing history at a professional level.

HIEU 7013 Anthropology of Ancient Greece

Jon Lendon    Mo 6:00pm - 8:30pm

A survey of anthropological methods useful for the study of the past: simultaneously an economic introduction to the Great Books of anthropology, to a prominent aspect of contemporary classical scholarship, and to the opportunities and problems presented by using the methods of one field to illuminate another.

HIST 7331 History of Gender and Sexuality

Thomas Klubock    Mo 3:30pm - 6:00pm

A survey of recent literature on the history of gender and sexuality from the late eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. The class is both comparative and transnational with readings drawn from literatures on the United States, Europe, Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.

HIST 9022 Tutorial in Global Legal History

Paul Halliday    TBA

Considers key ideas and practices in global legal history, ca. 1500-1900. Explores the interaction of European law with non-European cultures as empires expanded; the development of the law of the sea; and early ideas and practices in the law of nations. Independent Study Required.

HIEU 9024 Tutorial in the History of Modern Britain

Erik Linstrum    TBA

This tutorial introduces the major themes, debates, and methods of historical writing on modern Britain. It is intended particularly, though not exclusively, as field preparation for the general examination. Topics include the domestic ramifications of war and empire, the expanding reach of the state and the market, the adaptability of tradition, the contradictions of liberalism, and the meanings of modernity.

HIEU 9025 Tutorial in the Late Roman Republic

Elizabeth Meyer    TBA

This tutorial will cover the most tumultuous period in Roman Republican history, that which stretches from 133 BC to the establishment of Octavian (Augustus) as the first emperor in 27 BC.

*HIEU 3041 The Fall of the Roman Republic

Elizabeth Meyer    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

Surveys the history and culture of the last century of the Roman Republic (133-30 b.c.), emphasizing the political and social reasons for the destruction of the Republican form of government and its replacement by a monarchy.

*HIEU 3152 The British Empire and the Making of the Modern World

Erik Linstrum    MoWe 11:00am - 11:50am

This course will focus primarily on the 'second' empire in Asia and Africa, although the first empire in the Americas will be our first topic. Topics covered include the slave plantations in the West Indies, the American Revolution, the rise of the British East India Company and its control of India, and the Scramble for Africa. Special emphasis will be placed on the environmental history of our points of debarkation.

*HIST 3281 Genocide

Jeffrey Rossman    TBA

History of genocide and other forms of one-sided, state-sponsored mass killing in the twentieth century. Case studies include the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Rwandan genocide, and the mass killings that have taken place under Communist regimes (e.g., Stalin's USSR, Mao's China, Pol Pot's Cambodia).

*HIEU 3321 The Scientific Revolution, 1450-1700

Karen Parshall    TuTh 9:30am - 10:45am

Studies the history of modern science in its formative period against the backdrop of classical Greek science and in the context of evolving scientific institutions and changing views of religion, politics, magic, alchemy, and ancient authorities.

*HIEU 3352 Modern German History

Manuela Achilles    MoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pm

How do fascist movement emerge? What helps them gather steam? Should anti-democratic ideologues enjoy the freedoms of speech and association even if they use these rights to attack the foundations of democracy? Can a troubled history catalyze constructive dialogue about social justice and reconciliation? This class will look to German history for lessons from the past. Over the course of this semester, we will explore the origins and impacts of Nazi ideology; colonialism, war and genocide; the Cold War and its legacies (including the East German nostalgia for life under Communism); and the revival of xenophobic nationalism in the 21st century. We will also explore how Germany has dealt with its terrifying history of racial nationalism and to what extent it already is the multiethnic nation of immigrants it aspires to become.

*HIEU 3372 German Jewish Culture and History

Gabriel Finder, Jeffrey Grossman    TuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm

This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture and history of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Sigmund Freud.

*HIST 3452 The Second World War

Philip Zelikow    MoWe 9:00am - 9:50am

This course provides a survey of the greatest, most destructive war in human history. Perhaps 50 million people were killed in the Second World War, and the conflict reached every corner of the globe. Its political, social, and human consequences were vast and shape the world we live in today.

*HIEU 3505 History and Fiction, Topics - Hitler

Manuela Achilles    MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm

Who was Adolf Hitler and what explains our enduring fascination with the Hitler phenomenon? Was his rise to power an aberrant historical accident or a logical outcome of German history? What was more decisive in shaping the catastrophic course of events under Hitler's regime: his personality or deep structural historical factors? Would history have turned out better (or worse) if Hitler had been accepted into art school or died in infancy? Do melodramatic depictions of his last days normalize or even trivialize the Holocaust? Is it acceptable to laugh about or even empathize with Hitler today? This course investigates Hitler's life and afterlife on the basis of a broad variety of sources. Course materials range from scholarly articles to Nazi propaganda, films, novels, counterfactual histories and Hitler representations on the internet. Throughout this course, we will combine an interest in the personal dimensions of Hitler's rule with the study of power structures, social interests, aesthetic forms, generational shifts, and national frames. We will pay particular attention to the affective logics and representational regimes that shape our understanding of the past (and present).

*HIEU 3692 The Holocaust

Gabriel Finder    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

This course aims to clarify basic facts and explore competing explanations for the origins and unfolding of the Holocaust (the encounter between the Third Reich and Europe's Jews between 1933 and 1945) that resulted in the deaths of almost six million Jews.

*HIEU 3802 Origins of Contemporary Thought

Allan Megill    TuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm

This class examines the work of four thinkers who have been massively important in modern thought: Charles Darwin, Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, and Martin Heidegger. The span is from Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) to Heidegger’s philosophically path-breaking Being and Time (1927), but issues of contemporary relevance will be kept firmly in mind, and these thinkers will all be connected to the wider intellectual and cultural contexts that they reflected and in part also created.

*HIEU 4502 Seminar in Post-1700 European History - Stalinism

Jeffrey Rossman    Mo 3:30pm - 6:00pm

The major seminar is a small class (not more than 15 students) intended primarily but not exclusively for history majors who have completed two or more courses relevant to the topic of the seminar. The work of the seminar results primarily in the preparation of a substantial (ca. 25 pp. in standard format) research paper. Some restrictions and prerequisites apply to enrollment. See a history advisor or the director of undergraduate studies.

French

For more courses in the French Department, please visit: https://french.as.virginia.edu/course-descriptions.

FREN 5510/8510 Topics in Medieval Literature - Medieval Saints' Lives

Amy Ogden    MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm

Topics may include genres (romance, poetry, hagiography, chanson de geste, allegory), themes (love, war, nature), single authors (Chrétien de Troyes, Machaut) and cultural and literary issues (gender, religion, authorship, rewritings).

FREN 5585/8585 Topics in Civilization / Cultural Studies - Questioning the Archive in Postcolonial Studies

Ferial Boutaghou    Th 3:30pm - 6:00pm

This course will question nineteenth century archives in postcolonial francophone studies and their impact in writing cultural history. Colonialism destroyed cultural archives partly or completely. To understand the writing of cultural history in postcolonial contexts, it is urgent to have a better understanding of where the archives are and how we can explore them to write a decolonized cultural history. How do we think the foundation of the archive? What kind of periodization can we imagine? What are the specific questions scholars need to ask when confronted to period of History lacking cultural resources? How can we then fill the gaps left by colonization?

*FREN 4410 The Enlightenment

Jennifer Tsien    TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm

The Enlightenment laid the foundations for our current conceptions of democratic government, religious toleration, freedom of speech, and the scientific method. The readings for this course may include works by Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Prerequisite: FREN 3032

*FREN 4580 Advanced Topics in Literature - The Extreme Contemporary

Ari Blatt    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

This course is designed as a survey of contemporary French literature. One might even call it an introduction to what has come to be known as “extremely contemporary” French literature (l’extrême contemporain), which is to say books that have been published within the last few years. After an initial consideration of some of the major trends to have emerged on the French literary scene since the turn of the twenty-first century, students will read a selection of texts (fictions, non-fictions, and works that fall somewhere in between) that have been hailed by critics and readers alike. While the course focuses on what kinds of books the French are reading today, we will also consider how they read, how they talk about what they are reading, and how they inform themselves further about what to read next by consulting a number of essential and readily available resources for enthusiasts of contemporary French writing, like magazines, radio programs, websites, blogs, book reviews, and television programs (indeed, the French have a long tradition of producing quality “book tv”). Works by writers such as Jean Rolin, Jean Echenoz, Maylis de Kerangal, Vincent Almendros, Gael Faye, Leila Slimani, and Michel Houellebecq may find their way onto the syllabus. We will also endeavor to schedule a few opportunities for students to discuss their readings (over skype) with the writers themselves.

*FREN 4585 Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies - Global Paris: The Complexity of Place

Janet Horne    MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm

When Notre Dame burned, the world cried. When violent terrorist attacks brought Paris to its knees, the world watched helpless and aghast. In January 2015, merely days after the first attack, Parisians stunned us with their resilience, marching in the streets to defend their freedoms and way of life. Handmade signs proclaimed “We are not afraid!” and demonstrators raised pens and pencils skyward in a symbolic assertion of the power of free speech. In Charlottesville and across the United States, protestors did the same in a gesture of solidarity.

Mort pour rien. Dead for no reason. Today, in response to the senseless and racist killing of Georges Floyd, indignation echoes throughout France. French protestors brandish Black Lives Matter signs and cry out for racial justice, reigniting pent up fury over the 2016 killing of a black man, Adama Traoré, while in police custody in a suburb of Paris.

A crossroads for people from every imaginable background, Paris has always been a transnational city of immigrants, students, political exiles, formerly colonized peoples, artists, writers and people just trying to make a living. The principal theater of the French Revolution, it earned a reputation for insurrection and protest. The vibrant heart of artistic life and intellectual debate, Paris became the model of a19th-century city.

A global city, Paris is today so much more than the capital of France; it holds meaning the world over. A real city of grit and struggle, it is also symbolic of lofty and complex ideals.

How did Paris achieve such iconic status on the world stage? What myths and historical moments have defined it? Why did James Baldwin or Ernest Hemingway go there and what did they find? What might you hope to find there?

Together, we will explore maps, paintings and film that illustrate key features of the history, topography, architecture, and neighborhoods of Paris. We will discover the imagined city in art, literature and song. In particular, we will interrogate the “American dream” of Paris, Black Paris, its promises and mirages. By the end of this course, Paris will be a familiar place and you will have a good understanding of how the traces of the past remain inscribed on the modern urban landscape. You will be able “to read” the city, unlock its codes, and hopefully find personal enrichment there, even from a distance.

Prerequisite: FREN 3032 plus one additional course in French above FREN 3040.

*FREN 4811 Francophone Literature of Africa

Kandioura Drame    TuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm

Surveys the literary tradition in French, emphasizing post-World War II poets, novelists, and playwrights. Examines the role of cultural reviews in the development of this literary tradition. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 and at least one FREN course numbered 3041 to 3043 (or instructor permission).

German

For more courses in the Department of German, please visit: https://german.as.virginia.edu/course-descriptions.

*GETR 3372 German Jewish Culture and History

Gabriel Finder, Jeffrey Grossman    TuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm

This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history and thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.

*GETR 3464 Medieval Stories of Love and Adventure

William McDonald    TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm

This course traces the lineage and shapes of the Arthurian legend as witnessed in medieval literature and modern adaptations, including film and television ("Games of Thrones," "Star Wars," etc.) The aim is familiarity with the story of King Arthur and his court, as well as an ability to appreciate the permutations of the legend in all forms of media.

*GETR 3505 History and Fiction, Topics - Hitler

Manuela Achilles    MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm

Who was Adolf Hitler and what explains our enduring fascination with the Hitler phenomenon? Was his rise to power an aberrant historical accident or a logical outcome of German history? What was more decisive in shaping the catastrophic course of events under Hitler's regime: his personality or deep structural historical factors? Would history have turned out better (or worse) if Hitler had been accepted into art school or died in infancy? Do melodramatic depictions of his last days normalize or even trivialize the Holocaust? Is it acceptable to laugh about or even empathize with Hitler today?

This course investigates Hitler's life and afterlife on the basis of a broad variety of sources. Course materials range from scholarly articles to Nazi propaganda, films, novels, counterfactual histories and Hitler representations on the internet. Throughout this course, we will combine an interest in the personal dimensions of Hitler's rule with the study of power structures, social interests, aesthetic forms, generational shifts, and national frames. We will pay particular attention to the affective logics and representational regimes that shape our understanding of the past (and present).

*GETR 3562 New German Cinema

Paul Dobryden    TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm

Examines German art cinema from the 1960s-1980s, focusing on modernist aesthetics and filmic responses to major historical events in post-war Germany. Films by Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders, Kluge, Sander, von Trotta, and others.

*GETR 3590 Course(s) in English - Fairy Tales or Serial Media

Marcel Schmid    

Reading and discussion of German texts compared to texts from other literatures (all in English translation), with the aim of illuminating a central theoretical, historical, or social issue that transcends national boundaries.

*GETR 3692 The Holocaust

Gabriel Finder    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

This course aims to clarify basic facts and explore competing explanations for the origins and unfolding of the Holocaust--the encounter between the Third Reich and Europe's Jews between 1933 and 1945 that resulted in the deaths of almost six million Jews.

*GETR 3710 Kafka and His Doubles

Lorna Martens    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

The course will introduce the enigmatic work of Franz Kafka: stories including "The Judgment," "The Metamorphosis," "A Country Doctor," "A Report to an Academy," "A Hunger Artist," "The Burrow," and "Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk"; one of his three unpublished novels (The Trial); the Letter to His Father; and some short parables. But we will also look at Kafka's "doubles": the literary tradition he works with and the way in which he, in turn, forms literary tradition. Thus: Kafka: Cervantes, Kafka: Bible, Kafka: Aesop, Kafka: Dostoevsky, Kafka: Melville; Kafka: O'Connor, Kafka: Singer; Kafka: Calvino, Kafka: Borges. Readings will center on four principal themes: conflicts with others and the self (and Kafka's psychological vision); the double; the play with paradox and infinity; and artists and animals. A seminar limited to 16 participants. Requirements include a short midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper (10-12 pages).

*GETR 3720 Freud and Literature

Lorna Martens    TuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm

In formulating his model of the psyche and his theory of psychoanalysis, Freud, a scientist with a vast humanistic education, availed himself of analogies drawn from various fields, including mechanics, optics, philosophy, politics--and not least, literature. Freud textualized the human mind, turning the stories generated by its different levels into an object of analysis. But if literature was formative for psychoanalysis, Freud's ideas in turn captured the imagination of many twentieth-century literary writers. After introducing Freud's theories through a reading of his major works, including The Interpretation of Dreams, the course will turn to literary works by post-Freudian writers, including Kafka, Schnitzler, Breton, Lawrence, and Woolf, that engage with Freud's masterplot.

Media Studies 

For more courses in the Media Studies Department, please visit: https://bit.ly/3ixd642.

*MDST 3510 Topics in Media Research - Border Media

Camilla Fojas    We 3:30pm - 6:00pm

This hands-on course prepares students to read, evaluate, and design research in media studies. Drawing on critical, historical, administrative, and industrial traditions in the field, students will learn to assess the validity and anticipate the ethical requirements of various methods & data collection procedures. Following a theme selected by the instructor, the course culminates with each student proposing a new, original research study.

Politics

For more courses in the Department of Politics, please visit: https://louslist.org/page.php?Semester=1208&Type=Group&Group=Politics.

PLPT 4500 Special Topics in Political Theory - Global Ethics and Politics

Jennifer Rubenstein    We 2:00pm - 4:30pm

In this course, we will consider the ethical dimensions of pressing global issues, including severe poverty, pandemics, climate change, and large-scale disasters. We will also consider the relationship between ethics and politics, including how ethical arguments and stances function politically and the relationship between ethics and democracy.

*PLAD 4500 Special Topics - Migration

David Leblang    Tu 5:00pm - 7:30pm

*PLCP 3120 Politics and Political Economy of the Welfare State

Herman Schwartz    MoWe 4:00pm - 4:50pm

This seminar investigates the origins, expansion, and stabilization (or crisis - take your pick) of the welfare state in the rich OECD countries (North America, Western Europe, Japan, Australia and New Zealand) focussing on why market and non-market based systems of social protection emerged and the roles played by states, labor market actors, and women's groups.

*PLIR 3760 Russia/USSR in World Affairs

Allen Lynch    TBA    

Surveys the international relations of the Russian state, looking at Imperial legacies, the Soviet era from 1917-85, the Gorbachev era, and post-Soviet problems of Russian foreign policy. Prerequisite: Some background in international relations or the history of Russia.

Religious Studies

For more courses in the Department of Religious Studies, please visit: https://religiousstudies.as.virginia.edu/current-courses.

RELG 5320 Research Seminar in Religion, Conflict, and Peace

Peter Ochs    TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm

Advanced research on religion, politics and conflict for students of "religion-on-religion" conflict/conflict resolution. Research methods drawn from religious studies, politics, anthropology and linguistics, history, sociology, nursing, philosophy, systems analysis and data science. Topics recommended by current work in the Global Covenant of Religions, the UVA Initiative on Religion in Conflict, and other professional work in the field.

*RELJ 3052 Responses to the Holocaust

Jennifer Geddes    Th 2:00pm - 4:30pm

*RELJ 3170 Modern Jewish Thought

Asher Biemann    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

*RELJ 3372 German Jewish Culture and History

Gabriel Finder, Jeffrey Grossman    TuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm

This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the culture, history & thought of German Jewry from 1750 to 1939. It focuses on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe and the lasting transformations in Jewish life in Europe and later North America. Readings of such figures as: Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Rahel Varnhagen, Franz Kafka, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Karl Marx, Rosa Luxembourg, Walter Benjamin, and Freud.

*RELG 3605 Religion, Violence and Strategy: How to Stop Killing in the Name of God

Jerry White    Mo 5:00pm - 7:30pm

This course will teach students to evaluate critically the leadership and strategies of social impact campaigns, and the ways in which governments, religious actors and civil society have tried to reduce violent conflict. Students will be organized into small integrated teams to research the root causes and triggers for religion-related violence across the Middle East and North Africa.

Sociology

For more courses in the Department of Sociology, please visit: https://sociology.as.virginia.edu/graduate-courses.

SOC 5030 Classical Sociological Theory

Kumar      Th 9:30-12:00pm

Seminar focusing on the writing of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, and other social theories. Open to students in related disciplines. Prerequisites: Six credits of sociology or permission of instructor; open to advanced undergraduates

SOC 5140 Qualitative Methods

Greenland      Th 12:30pm - 3:00pm

This course is designed as an introductory overview of qualitative research methods.  The course begins with a review of the logic of social enquiry and the basis for claiming sociological knowledge.  We then consider a variety of analytic and interpretive approaches to sociological research.  The methods covered include interviewing, grounded theory, content analysis, field methods/ethnography, and historical and comparative sociology using documentary/archival materials.  We will be reading theoretical, didactic and exemplary materials.

SOC 5320 Sociology of Gender

Pugh     M 3:00pm - 5:30pm

This course will explore the social construction and consequences of gender, covering such topics as work, care, sexuality, identity, politics and inequality.  Readings will include the classics as well as newer works in the field. Prerequisites: Six credits of sociology or permission of instructor.

SOC 8030 Sociological Issues

Bair     Th 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Contemporary issues affecting sociology as a science, as an academic discipline, and as a profession.  Frequent guest lectures.

SOC 8054 Political Sociology

Wang    T 9:30am – 12:00pm

Explores the relationships between social structure and political institutions.  Competing theories about such topics as power structures, political participation, ideology, party affiliation, voting behavior, and social movements are discussed in the context of recent research on national and local politics in the United States.

SOC 9510 Advanced Topics in Culture - Postcolonial Memory

Jeffrey Olick    TBA

*SOC 3410 Race and Ethnic Relations

Rose Buckelew    MoWe 1:00pm - 1:50pm

Introduces the study of race and ethnic relations, including the social and economic conditions promoting prejudice, racism, discrimination, and segregation.  Examines contemporary American conditions, and historical and international materials.

*SOC 3490 Cities and Cultures

Ekaterina Makarova    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

Explores the ways in which physical environments shape and are shaped by social life.  Examines the relationship between urban space and culture in different historical and social settings, though there is a particular focus on the rise and development of modernity as expressed through the experience of particular cities.

*SOC 3559 Environment, Globalization, and Development

Mary Wilks    TuTh 9:30am - 10:45am

This course provides a sociological overview of Earth’s changing environment, starting with the impact of past disasters that affected climate and living beings. Then it considers growing evidence of accelerating climate change and its impact on environment, humans and other species, while also considering initiatives to combat it. It combines relevant sociological and other literature with student searches of major newspapers and periodicals.

*SOC 4750 Racism

Buckelew   T 12:30pm - 1:45 pm

Racism, the disparagement and victimization of individuals and groups because of a belief that their ancestry renders them intrinsically different and inferior, is a problem in many societies. In this course we will examine the problem of racism by investigating the workings of these sociological processes theoretically, historically, and contemporaneously. Prerequisites: Six credits of sociology or permission of instructor.

Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese

For more courses in the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, please visit: https://spanitalport.as.virginia.edu/course-descriptions.

SPAN 5800 / SPAN7559 Spanish America: Colonial Period to 1800

Allison Bigelow    Th 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Este curso proporciona un panorama de la literatura latinoamericana en el periodo que abarca el examen de maestría del área colonial: 1492-1700. Los textos primarios nos ayudarán a entender la complejidad cultural del periodo colonial, mientras las fuentes secundarias nos orientarán a varias preguntas abiertas y polémicas historiográficas. Al final del curso, la alumna o el alumno será capaz de analizar los textos de la lista del examen de maestría, situar varios temas claves dentro del contexto histórico-intelectual de la época y mostrar su conocimiento a través de una presentación oral, examen parcial y un proyecto final. Conforme al interés de la alumna o el alumno, el proyecto puede ser orientado a las investigaciones o a la enseñanza. Aprovechando el rol del examen en el programa de maestría, también leeremos textos que tratan de la profesionalización, abordando temas como la organización, el examen, el estrés y la vida académica.

SPAN 7850 Caribbean Environmental Humanities

Charlotte Rogers      We 3:30 - 6:00pm

Why have outsiders depicted the Caribbean as a hellish site of malaria and hurricanes and also as a tourist Eden?  How do peoples of the Caribbean define their own relationship to the islands’ ecologies? This graduate level seminar considers these questions through the lens of the environmental humanities, an emerging method of study that unites humanistic inquiry with environmental science. We will survey the intertwined ecological and human histories of the archipelago from the colonial era to the twenty-first century. Topics include deforestation, the plantation system, natural resource extraction, scientific experimentation on Caribbean peoples and landscapes, and the social and ecological ramifications of tourism. The course will emphasize how artists and writers recognize and resist the legacies of environmental depredation and human exploitation in the region. Our areas of inquiry will range over literature, art, tropical medicine, the history of science, environmental activism, social justice movements and cultural studies. This class counts towards the Graduate Certificate in Environmental Humanities. Class discussions will be in English. Readings will be in Spanish, French, and English with optional translations.

SPAN 7850 Space and Place in Hispanic Literature and Culture

Ricardo Pardon      Mo 3:30pm - 6:00pm

Writing of all kinds is often used to map spaces and describe places, facilitating all sorts of and imaginative relationships between readers and locales both near and far. We might think of the way travel narrative facilitates virtual journeys, or the way a novel is said to evoke the place in which the story is set. The current moment is a propitious time to explore these issues, thanks to the so-called “spatial turn” in the human sciences, the renewed attention to space and place that has marked any number of disciplines over the course of the last few decades. In this course, we will review some of the major theoretical statements of humanistic geography and of critical geography, and consider the opportunities created by juxtaposing writing with cartography. We will also apply what we have learned to a repertoire of texts from a variety of periods in the literary and cultural history of Spain and Latin America. Registered students will be given the opportunity to provide input regarding which texts we will use.

This course is primarily intended for graduate students in the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, but is open to all students in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Students from outside the department will be able to read in English or other languages, and the language of instruction will be English

*ITTR 3685 Italy on Screen: Sex, Gender, & Racial Identities

Francesca Calamita    MoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm

This course considers representations of sex, gender and racial identities in Italian films, television, advertisements and other forms of visual culture. With a focus on the contemporary Italian context, students will explore issues of intersectionality from a global perspective. What can Italian critically acclaimed and more mainstream works tell us about diversity and inclusion in the worldwide context?

*ITTR 4010 Narrating (Un-)sustainability: Ecocritical Explorations in Italy & Mediterr

Enrico Cesaretti    TuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm

This course focuses on the potential narratives have to convey messages that are relevant to our ethical and environmental awareness, and to help us imagine alternatives to existing systems of knowledge and distributions of power. We shall learn about the origins and general objectives of ecocriticism, its relevant theories and methodologies, and various approaches to the notion of sustainability.

*ITTR 4820 Italian Pop Culture From the 1960s to the Present

Enrico Cesaretti    TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm

This course examines the cultural and socio-political transformations that took place in Italy during its recent history. By discussing different cultural artifacts (films, essays, literature), we shall ultimately try to answer the following questions : does Italy still have space for works that resist populist and consumer culture? What are the ethical and political consequences of Italy's present culutral condition? Is there an Italian identity?

*POTR 4559 Global South: Brazilian Soccer in a Global Context

Eli Carter    Tu 4:00pm - 6:30pm

Brazilian "futebol" or soccer has long been celebrated throughout the world for its myriad stars and singular style of play. Providing a broad historical overview of the development of soccer in Brazil, the objective of this course is to explore cultural and socio-political issues raised by the sport, all while connecting these to broader processes of globalization beginning in the early 1990s.

*SPAN 4700 Spanish Culture and Civilization

Fernando Opere    MoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm

This course focuses on the major political events in the history of Spain, from 1900 to the present, as well as on the study of the most important Spanish artistic movements, and their most relevant contemporary representatives, in the fields of music, painting, architecture, and dance. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010, 3300, and 3 credits of 3400-3430, or departmental placement.

Architecture

ARH 5601 Historic Preservation Theory and Practice

Andrew Johnston    We 6:00pm - 8:30pm

This seminar surveys preservation from its historical beginnings through contemporary emerging trends, focusing on the changing nature of its ideals and practice in a critical and international perspective. We will explore the role of historic preservation and heritage in cultural politics, historical interpretation, urban development, and planning and design practice. Graduate course will have additional course requirements.

ARH 7613 UNESCO, World Heritage and Tourism

Andrew Johnston    Fr 9:00am - 11:30am

Open to all, this course concerns the interplay of UNESCO, heritage practices, & tourism in a comparative, international context. We will ask questions concerning definitions of heritage, decision-making concerning heritage resources, tangible & intangible heritage, tourism, & the ties between heritage & economic development, among other questions. While focused on China & the Asia-Pacific Region. Graduate students will have additional course requirements.

Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy

LPPP 5559 Policy Design & Statecraft

Philip Zelikow    Mo 2:00pm - 4:30pm

The seminar orients students to the professional world of statecraft by working through historical case studies. Breaking down critical episodes step by step, analyzing the perspectives, information, and choices of different participants, students gain more lifelike education and insight. Applying templates for policy design and assessment, they get more experience working on public problems and learning a lot of history along the way.